Thursday, 28 January 2016

Half Brother-Kenneth Oppell

When I read the blurb of this book in the library, I had high expectations for this book. Two scientists, an impressionable child, a chimpanzee, animal rights and cross fostering? Who wouldn't want to read this book? But what I didn't expect is that the book would have me clutching two pillows, crying and screaming and sipping cocoa and realizing that I was changed for life.

Okay, hyperbole fault (Yes, Adi Alsaid, P.S. I love you). But the book was mind blowing-ly amazing and it DID make me cry. A lot. Not only was this a completely different kind of book, it was also something very close to my heart (I can't believe I said that). To have a younger sibling who is significantly younger than you and looks up to you is no different from being a parent. You feel fiercely protective them and fiercely proud of their smallest of small accomplishments. God forbid anyone tell you anything bad about them. You will devour them. You will tear them to pieces. My brother is without doubt the best thing that has ever happened to me. He has the most naughty of naughty smiles. His eyes literally crinkle when he has done something bad. To say that I love him, would be grossly undermining it.

The story goes like this: Ben Tomlin's parents are scientists. His father has gotten a grant to conduct a linguistic experiment with a baby chimpanzee in Victoria, Canada. At first, Ben is angry with his father for relocating them from their lives in Toronto, but then,he slowly comes around to accepting the chimpanzee as his little brother; naming him Zan, after Tarzan.

Wikipedia defines cross fostering as:
Cross-fostering is a technique used in animal husbandry, animal science, genetic and nature versus nurture studies, and conservation, whereby offspring are removed from their biological parents at birth and raised by surrogates.
And that is essentially what Zan experienced with the Tomlins. Mrs. Tomlin is basing her doctoral thesis on how Zan is being cross fostered as a human and along the way, gets attached as his mother. Mr. Tomlin on the other hand, is not of the same opinion. He sees Zan just as a lab rat and prefers to be at the edge of the project. But Ben, becomes attached to Zan and truly loves him as his brother and Zan reciprocates the same.

Zan is looked after and observed by graduate students from the university.  But all of them look at him as a project and not as a human with the exception of Peter McIvor, who is nothing like Dr Tomlin.

When Dr. Tomlin does not get a grant from the university and a linguist, Greg Jaworski declares Project Zan a failure, Ben is forced to let go of Zan to a Professor who has an inhumane aspect towards anything that isn't human.

Now, Ben must find a way to rescue Zan with help from his mother,Peter and reluctantly, even his father.

A coming-of-age story with the story of family, love and humanity at it's core makes this a book you MUST read at all costs.

Rating : 5/5

Yours,
Zoe SUmmers

How to Burn someone 101

This totally happened

This is why she's AMAZING

😂😂😂😂😂😂😂

Sunday, 24 January 2016

Wait...he's NOT married to Bucky?

...I can't you guys...I can't put a smart caption for this one because I'm still laughing way too hard.:

When you think tumblr is finally serious but....

Aaaand there went my mind. Blown.:

Islamophobia, Racism and Why You Shouldn't Vote For Donald Trump



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See that? Yeah, that happened.

Yes, it was very upsetting. It's frightening because when it's someone on the internet, you don't know what they''re going to do because they are open to all resources. 

Here is a person who's telling me that he would have no qualms about killing innocent people or even his own family. And you can't say that he's Muslim because he has clearly cut all connections with his religion. And I don't have a problem with that because who you choose worship* is none of my business. 

I have no idea what his family life is like, so I'm not in a position to judge him. But if his parents are innocent people, then I find it very unfair that they don't have an inkling of what their son/brother is planning on doing. He needs help. They need help. I fear for their safety because this person is clearly genocidal.

To answer the smart ass who wants to know why I add strangers on Facebook in the first place: You're absolutely right. I shouldn't. But I still do, and that doesn't give me a reason to not be upset about this. It's wrong. You cannot prosecute him because this is so obviously a fake account. The thing is, I can't do anything about it. I have asked Facebook to delete his account, but with the amount of complaints received by them, I don't feel very positive about THAT happening.

My point is, racism is not an okay thing for you to be involved in. Whatever views you have about a certain race or person, KEEP IT TO YOURSELF AND CHANGE IT IF IT'S RIDICULOUSLY WRONG. You're no better than the rest of us because, in the end, you are going to die and there is nothing you can do about it because there is no death cure in existence as of today.

On an entirely unrelated topic (but not THAT different), all of you must know who Donald Trump is. Apparently, he's the leading GOP candidate in the American Presidential race. He wants to send everyone who is not a Caucasian white male, back to their respective countries. He has said that he would ban all Muslims from entering the U.S. And this was met by a thunderous round of applause.

And that is not all. Recently, a harmless Muslim woman who had just come out to one of his rallies to see for herself what all the fuss was about was jeered at by the whole audience and escorted by security out of the audience and all this was done in the presence of Donald Trump who calmly watched the whole proceeding.

Is that really the kind of man you want for President? One who promotes racism, has no respect for women and has a history of bad financing abilities?

Coming back to my original topic, I am aware that there will always be people who just can't accept people for who they are. There will always be a power shift for as long as humanity exists because that's what we're good at, fighting. But that doesn't mean that we shouldn't do anything about it.

Ignoring it does not make the problem go away. What I am asking you to do, is to not stay unresponsive to such people.Stand up to them. Tell them that their beliefs are wrong. That it's disgusting and medieval. Report them to an authority that you know, would not take it irresponsibly.

That is all. Because all those people being judged based on their religion, race or sexuality are just like you. And it's time you respect that.

Yours,
Zoe Summers

*worship- if you don't identify with any religion, I apologize for not having specified that.

Thursday, 21 January 2016

#Schice

This scene was so sweet, I loved how he held her hair back #Schmece:

This needed to be said



The same goes for the extremely immature notion: "Oh you support gay rights? You MUST be gay. It's okay honey, no one will judge you if you come out." The only person judging me is YOU! Just like loving Pokemon does not make you a cartoon show.

Yours,
Zoe Summers

Wednesday, 20 January 2016

The only time I wasn't #Team Parker

Good guy Loki.:

On my bookshelf this week #2


Aren't they beautiful?

  1. Mosquitoland - David Arnold
  2. Finding Paris - Joy Preble
  3. A Mad, Wicked Folly - Sharon Biggs Walter
  4. Sphinx's Princess - Esther Friesner
  5. Here, There Be Dragons - James A. Owen
  6. Across the Universe - Beth Revis


I know. It's a bit too road trip-py. But I've been dying to get out of town.

Yours,
Zoe Summers

A typical example of society's misogynism

Tuesday, 12 January 2016

On my bookshelf this week




Feed by Mira Grant
Messenger of Fear by Micheal Grant
The tattooed heart by Micheal Grant
The Statistical Probability of Love at First Sight by Jennifer E. Smith
Between the Lines by Jodi Picoult and Samantha Van Leer
Bombay Blues by Tanuja Desai Hidier
Since You Asked by Maurene Goo
Red Rising by Pierce Brown

A truly amazing birthday book haul.

Yours,
Zoe Summers